Dino’s Journal 📖

Bookmarks

I ran into the “Five Whys” technique in Anne-Laure Le Cunff's 5 thinking tools to add to your metacognitive toolbox.

Yes, I'm aware that the article says 5 thinking tools, but I only wanted to focus on just one — the “Five Whys” technique.

The “Five Whys” is a technique you can use to find an answer or a root cause, to a problem, a question, a desire or a perceived need.

^ Note that this is not how Anne-Laure Le Cunff described it in her post, but this is my own take on how and when to use it.

Has there been something you really wanted or wanted to do, but could not explain why you wanted it? If your answer is yes, then this is the thinking tool for you.

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Tuned in to learn more about the Wisephone, but stayed for the parenting advice and philosophical/theological discussions. Excellent podcast. Well worth the 2 hours run time.

If you are a parent of young kids and you are concerned about how distracted you are around them, then you will find a lot to relate to in this podcast.

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Interesting Reads

Personal Publishing Principles — this is a great read for someone interested in creating/maintaining a personal website or a personal blog.

One good tip that was shared in that post is that a personal website/blog is the perfect place for you to experiment with your own ideas. Not everything will work out of course, but keep trying and some will.

This also tells me that if your personal website won't allow you to do that, then you probably have a professional website as opposed to a personal one.


‘Pics or it didn’t happen’ – the mantra of the Instagram era — extremely good read on the use of social media, and how it changes the way we think and go about our daily lives.

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An excellent read on the disconnect between wanting to achieve goals and the reality of not having “free time” to achieve them.

Link: No, you won’t make time. Because you can’t.


Here are some of my takeaways from reading this:

To achieve a goal, you have to give up something in return. In most cases, this means giving up time allocated to doing something you like, and using that time to work towards your goal.

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I ran into the Kalam Cosmological Argument in Matt Nelson's “God’s Existence and the Beginning of the Universe: Part I” piece. Supposedly, this argument can be used to prove the existence of a God or creator of the universe.

There are two premises for this argument:

  • The first one is that everything that begins to exist, has a reason for existence. This is also known as the principle of causality.
  • The second premise is that the universe began to exist.
    • Therefore, there must be a cause for the universe’s existence.

To say that the first premise is false seems very hard in the world we are living in today. How can something come out of nothing? If that were true, then we should at least notice this occurring around us.

Oooh, a car just showed up on my driveway. I wonder how that happened?

But we don’t, because something does not just come out of nothing. There is always a cause for something that exists. So how then do we explain the universe we live in? Did it come out of nothing or did something or some higher power cause it to exist?

Of course, being a religious person myself, the answer for me would be, that God created the universe we live in and everything in it. But I'm not writing this to force my beliefs on you. I just thought that this was a very compelling argument for the existence of a creator.

Does it unequivocally prove the existence of God? No. But it does make you wonder, right?

Tags: #Bookmarks #Theology

Discuss... or leave me a comment below.

Excellent TED talk on how our growing reliance on technology could be making us ill equipped to handle an unpredictable future.

Source: The human skills we need in an unpredictable world

A key takeaway for me is this:

The more we depend on technology to make decisions for us, the less we actually decide for ourselves. On the surface level this seems good; the less decisions you have to make, the more mental bandwidth you have later on to decide on something else.

The problem is that technology cannot measure everything in the world around us. It cannot measure people's reaction to certain things, it cannot measure feelings or emotions, it cannot measure a person's mood, etc... And so technology cannot reliably predict everything that's going on around you, nor can it reliably predict what's going to happen in the future. Hence, the decisions it makes is based on its own expected reality, not yours.

Tags: #Bookmarks #DecisionMaking

Discuss... or leave me a comment below.

Excellent read on why we're consuming information the wrong way. Also has some great tips on avoiding information overload.

Link: Fighting Infomania: Why 80% of Your Reading is a Waste of Time | Nat Eliason

Below are my takeaways from reading this.

Focus on consuming information that you know you need right now

Trying to consume everything to learn something, is not the best use of time. It is better to consume information that you know you need right now. Consuming information that you might need in the future, in other words reading just in case you will need it, is a waste of time.

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It's the end of the year and for some reason I'm itching to start writing journal entries again. I considered just turning this into another Weeknotes post, but I don't think I can keep up with that schedule. So, this will be the start of a new journal entry series.

I say new because I've had a journal entry series before. If you are a returning reader, you've most likely even read them. If you are a new reader, then you missed out on a number of cringe-worthy personal posts. And that's part of the reason that series came to an end. I somehow outgrew that phase and no longer wanted to write about overtly personal stuff.

So, for this new series, one of the things I want to focus on is just sharing what I've learned. Instead of this journal/series being about “What's been going on with my life?”, I want it to be more about “What have I learned today?”

Also, I won't commit to a schedule for posting. It could be once a month, once every 4 months, or even just once a year. Whatever it will turn out to be, I'll write one when I feel like writing. So before that urge to write fades, here goes.

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The subject of this short film is the theologian John Hull (1935-2015). He recorded the words featured in the film in an audio diary. The recording began in 1983, when he became fully blind after several years of progressively losing his sight.

Watch this short film and you'll gain a much better appreciation of your gift of sight.

Link: Notes on blindness

Listening to John's words as he describes the despair and the hole he finds himself in, trying to break through the wall of blindness, but never getting anywhere — it was at times hard to listen to. But that's what makes you really appreciate being able to see right now.

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A good read on why you might want to make use of “Read It Later” apps, like Pocket or Instapaper. Tiago also goes through his preferred setup and why it works for him.

Link: The Secret Power of ‘Read It Later’ Apps

Below are my two takeaways from reading this.

Make better use of idle time with a reading list

In this article, Tiago Forte quotes David Allen on the benefits of having an organized reading list available all the time. The reason being, is that life is full of these random moments where we don't have anything to do. Having an organized reading list can come in handy during those moments. It is better to spend that time reading something good, than to spend that time browsing social media or consuming junk information.

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